My Blog

As a twenty-year Army veteran, I served on the Korean DMZ under fire, as well as Vietnam. I have always been a voracious reader of many genres, and review books for numerous publishers. The main goal of PULP DEN is not only to showcase my books, but also to promote other writers and their books. I review Mystery, Science Fiction, Action and Adventure – and most everything Pulp. I do not read, review, or promote erotica, alternative lifestyle books, horror, vampire, zombies, or werewolves. Warning, if your idea of good writing is an over use of profanity, you will not get a good rating from me. Please keep that in mind. As a pulp magazine collector, I have complete runs of the major character pulps, and have read them all. I have been in pulp fandom since 1970, though a fan much longer. I publish my reviews on this Blog, Amazon, and in a print magazine I also write for. If anyone would be interested in reviewing any of my books, most can be found on Amazon – see the Link to Tom’s Books On Amazon. And contact me for pdf copies at fadingshadows40@gmail.com

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Altus Press Newsletter


Altus Press - October 2014 Update

Welcome to the First Altus Press Newsletter!

Before we get to the Altus Press news, here's a press release that was released just today:

Steeger Properties, LLC, Acquires the Copyrights to Popular Publications’ Pulp Magazines

For Immediate Release—October 21, 2014

Steeger Properties, LLCBoston, MA—October 21, 2014— Steeger Properties, LLC, has added to a growing collection of pulp fiction magazines by acquiring the copyrights to nearly 150 pulp magazine titles that were originally published byPopular Publications, Inc. Now claiming ownership to most of the pulp stories and characters published by both Popular Publications and The Frank A. Munsey Company, Steeger Properties, LLC, has accrued the copyrights to an estimated 6,000 issues and 30,000 stories.
“We’re proud to represent these thousands of stories and plan on introducing them to a whole new audience in as many mediums as possible,” said Matthew Moring, Manager of Steeger Properties, LLC, and Publisher of Altus Press.
Pulp fiction began in 1896 with Frank A. Munsey’s The Argosy Magazine. The 192-page magazine had untrimmed edges and the stories within the pages offered entertaining genre fiction ranging from adventure and mysteries to science fiction and westerns and everything in between. In six years, the magazine went from publishing a few thousand copies per month, to well over half a million copies. Argosy’s success was partially thanks to the variety of recurring characters it published, such as Tarzan and Zorro. Popular Publications, Inc.—the most successful pulp magazine publisher of its time—published such well-known authors as Raymond Chandler, Ray Bradbury and Erle Stanley Gardner within the pages of its own titles. In 1942, Popular Publications acquired The Frank A. Munsey Company.
Fast forward to 2014. While the popularity of pulp fiction has fluctuated over the years, the stories within the pages are classic fiction and are as influential to American pop culture as ever. They are fast paced, well-written short stories and novels featuring classic characters. There’s a huge audience that hasn’t had contact with these stories. By reintroducing them using today’s technology, these classic hard-boiled detective, mystery, western, and science fiction stories will be available for generations to come.
The Steeger Properties, LLC, catalog is available for licensing in all media.

About Steeger Properties, LLC

Steeger Properties, LLC, has accrued the copyrights to 30,000 pulp fiction stories and has plans to share its collection with a whole new audience. For more information, please visit www.steegerproperties.com and/or email Matthew Moring at steegerproperties@gmail.com.

Celebrate This News With Savings!

For a limited time, nearly all of Altus Press' ebooks have been discounted to just $2.99! Get them at www.altuspress.com, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or the iBookstore. But don't wait too long!

Our Most Recent Releases

All of these are new products since PulpFest (August). Click on any to get more info & order:
The Complete Adventures of Thibaut Corday and the Foreign Legion (Deluxe Edition)
Unprofitable Ivory: The Complete Tales of Kingi Bwana, Volume 2
Cyrano
Long Road to Tomorrow: The Complete Saga, Volume 2
Doc Savage: The Whistling Wraith
The Crime Master: The Complete Battles of Gordon Manning & The Griffin, Volume 1
Badmen on Halfaday Creek
Street Wolf: The Black Mask Stories of Frederick Nebel
Doc Savage: The Ice Genius
Buccaneer Blood: The Adventures of Denis Burke
Tomorrow: The Complete Saga, Volume 1
Secret Agent “X”: The Resurrection Ring
The Lost End of Nowhere: The Complete Tales of Kingi Bwana, Volume 1
Grey Maiden: The Story of a Sword Through the Ages, The Complete Saga
Hell’s-a-Poppin’ on Halfaday Creek
The Adventures of Faidit and Cercamon

That's it for this newsletter. See you next time!

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Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Correction to Steeger Properties

Just a quick correction to Steeger Properties, LLC. Matt didn’t get the rights to the hero pulp titles, like The Spider and Operator #5, but still acquired many titles.

Steeger Properties, LLC

Matt Moring of ALTUS PRESS has just acquired the copyrights to many of the POPULAR PUBLICATIONS pulp magazines, and we can look for great things ahead from the new imprint, STEEGER PROPERTIES, LLC.

Boston, MA—October 21, 2014— Steeger Properties, LLC has added to a growing collection of pulp fiction magazines by acquiring the copyrights to nearly 150 pulp magazine titles that were originally published by Popular Publications, Inc. Now claiming ownership to most of the pulp stories and characters published by both Popular Publications and The Frank A. Munsey Company, Steeger Properties, LLC, has accrued the copyrights to an estimated 6,000 issues and 30,000 stories.
“We’re proud to represent these thousands of stories and plan on introducing them to a whole new audience in as many mediums as possible,” said Matthew Moring, Manager of Steeger Properties, LLC, and Publisher of Altus Press.
Pulp fiction began in 1896 with Frank A. Munsey’s The Argosy Magazine. The 192-page magazine had untrimmed edges and the stories within the pages offered entertaining genre fiction ranging from adventure and mysteries to science fiction and westerns and everything in between. In six years, the magazine went from publishing a few thousand copies per month, to well over half a million copies. Argosy’s success was partially thanks to the variety of recurring characters it published, such as Tarzan and Zorro. Popular Publications, Inc.—the most successful pulp magazine publisher of its time—published such well-known authors as Raymond Chandler, Ray Bradbury and Erle Stanley Gardner within the pages of its own titles. In 1942, Popular Publications acquired The Frank A. Munsey Company.
Fast forward to 2014. While the popularity of pulp fiction has fluctuated over the years, the stories within the pages are classic fiction and are as influential to American pop culture as ever. They are fast paced, well-written short stories and novels featuring classic characters. There’s a huge audience that hasn’t had contact with these stories. By reintroducing them using today’s technology, these classic hard-boiled detective, mystery, western, and science fiction stories will be available for generations to come.
The Steeger Properties, LLC, catalog is available for licensing in all media.
About Steeger Properties, LLC

Steeger Properties, LLC, has accrued the copyrights to 30,000 pulp fiction stories and has plans to share its collection with a whole new audience. For more information, please visit www.steegerproperties.com and/or email Matthew Moring at steegerproperties@gmail.com.


Monday, October 20, 2014

New Pulp And New Pulp Fiction

New Pulp And New Pulp Heroes


Clancy O’Hara’s PULP #7
The hero pulp magazines ended in the summer of 1953, while genre pulp magazines continued through the late fifties, and even into the 1960’s. One had the gall to hang on until about 1972. But the end had arrived. Men’s adventure paperbacks were taking the place of those old magazines on the racks, and digest magazines replaced the SF, Mystery, Western & Romance pulps.
The pulp magazines had kept to a strict moral code watched over by publishers and editors, though some of the covers might have given a different impression of what was inside. By 1953, however, the hero pulps were not immune to the changing time, and the morals were beginning to evaporate. The final issues of The Phantom Detective, Dan Fowler (G-Men Detective), and The Black Bat (Black Book Detective) contained strong hints of sex and rougher language. But by then their time was dying, and the paperbacks had taken over for good.


Jerry Page’s The Armadillo
Let’s concentrate on the pulp hero, or I might use the term NEW PULP HERO at this phase. When did it start? That’s easy. The first we absolutely know of for sure, was Jerry Page’s The Armadillo, a masked hero that appeared in print just a few years after the hero pulp magazines ceased in the mid 1950s. By the 1960s there were new stories of The Shadow, to prove that OLD PULP HEROES were not dead. And others were writing clones of Doc Savage and Tarzan, like Phil Farmer and Lin Carter, among others. I don’t have a good track on all the new pulp heroes that were strangely appearing in paperback, but I could name some, if pressed. Even major comic book houses like Marvel and DC were bringing their characters out in prose paperback editions.


Tom Johnson’s The Black Ghost
Unfortunately, there wasn’t a concerted effort to maintain this new pulp/new pulp hero tradition until 1995. In January of that year – dated Winter - it all changed. The culprit was Clancy O’Hara’s PULP FICTION MAGAZINE - changed to PULP, A FICTION MAGAZINE with the third issue and just plain PULP with the seventh issue. And the first new pulp characters to arrive in Clancy’s magazine were Aaron B. Larson’s Haakon Jones, and Tom Johnson’s The Black Ghost, both appearing in early issues. In June 1995, Tom & Ginger Johnson’s FADING SHADOWS magazines kicked off with CLASSIC PULP FICTION STORIES and ran through December 2004, and the new pulp/new pulp heroes were claiming their place as “new pulp fiction”. Clancy may have been the first to call it NEW PULP, but we at FADING SHADOWS called it NEW STORIES IN THE PULP TRADITION. I’m not really sure when the NEW PULP banner started, but I imagine someone at Pro Se could fill us in.

As the reader can see, NEW PULP is really quite old. I still prefer NEW STORIES IN THE PULP TRADITION, however. Doesn’t that make sense? But whatever we call it, since 1995 NEW PULP FICTION has been going strong, and we’ve definitely seen some interesting characters show up on radar. In January 2015, the modern day pulp fiction will be twenty years old. Haakon Jones and The Black Ghost will also share that honor.

Friday, October 17, 2014

Fight Card - The Guns of November

Greetings,
Our October Fight Card title, Guns of November, with Joseph Grant (Fight Card: The Last Round of Archie Mannis) behind the Jack Tunney moniker, has slid into publication. It also sports a beautiful cover by Carl Yonder, who continues to go the distance for Fight Card …

FIGHT CARD: THE GUNS OF NOVEMBER

November, 1963...Sent to Dallas by Attorney General Robert Kennedy to investigate the disappearance of a boxer connected to a major Civil Rights violation, FBI Special Agent Jim Gregory finds himself desperately trading punches with those plotting to change the course of history.
         Kidnapped, beaten, tied up, and blindfolded, young boxer Jimmy Lee Williams knows his situation is dire. Nicknamed Guns for the relentless firing power of his fists, Williams isn’t going to go down without a fight. However, this is no typical 15-rounder...and the clock is ticking toward disaster.
         Mixing with a disparate group of Cuban exiles, the Mafia, the FBI, the CIA, and corrupt Dallas Police, Gregory’s search for Williams takes him into the heart of the JFK conspiracy.  In the Carousel Club, owner Jack Ruby – Gregory's old Chicago boxing opponent – introduces the undercover FBI agent to his many shady contacts, including a young, ex-Marine and Communist defector named Oswald…a man with unusual intelligence and connections to both the FBI and the CIA.
         With disaster looming, the latest Fight Card novel, Guns of November, is a two-fisted take on the tragic events you thought you knew, but never imagined...
         Amazon Link: http://tinyurl.com/mgubng4
         As always any mentions on blogs or social networking are very much appreciated.
         November will mark the return of Fight Card veteran David Foster with a brilliant take on Australia’s most notorious outlaw. The Iron Fists of Ned Kelly is rooted in fact, telling the tale of the legendary bare-knuckle boxing match between Kelly and Wild Wright – the man Kelly held responsible for his three year incarceration for horse stealing. Great stuff!
         The Iron Fists of Ned Kelly will feature a fantastic cover from the talented Mike Fyles, who also provides the cover for our second Fight Card Sherlock Holmes title – Blood to the Bone – from Andrew Salmon…
         Keep Punching,

 Paul